Author Archives: karbly

Daily Bread February 25

“Are we moving toward Jesus, the peaceful One?”
Karin Peter, president of seventy


As for me, I would seek God,
and to God I would commit my cause.
He does great things and unsearchable,
marvellous things without number.
He gives rain on the earth
and sends waters on the fields;
he sets on high those who are lowly,
and those who mourn are lifted to safety.
So the poor have hope,
and injustice shuts its mouth.  -Job 5:8-11, 16

I was participating in a spiritual formation meditation as part of a women’s online retreat. During the meditation, my imagination took me to aboard a ship. The old-mast-and-sails-and-rigging kind of ship. As I descended into the dark cargo hold in the belly of the ship, I experienced a sense of awareness of this phrase: “Carry your own cargo.” As I sat with that phrase for a while, I began to think of how often I have carried the cargo of others. Someone else’s expectation of what I should do or be, criticisms or grievances that are hard to release, societal norms for women “my age.”

When I reflect on moving toward Jesus, the peaceful One, it is easy to point toward ministries and practices in which I engage that lead to more peaceful, reconciled relationships with others. But more significantly, this past year moving towards Jesus, the peaceful One, has meant looking inward to reconcile my own self more fully in restoring, life-giving ways, to carry my own cargo. It’s an interesting metaphor, this sailing ship. One I continue to reflect upon as I journey with Jesus this Lenten Season.

Prayer Phrase

Are we moving toward Jesus, the peaceful One?

Spiritual Practice

Gospel Contemplation (Mark 1:9-11)

Each week during Lent, you are invited to pray with a different gospel story from the life of Christ. Use your senses and imagination to enter the text. Allow it to come to life in you, observing details, noticing interactions, even engaging in dialogue. Notice where you find yourself in the story and how you feel about what is happening. Notice what it evokes in you or invites of you. Take time to journal or enter silent prayer to reflect on your experience and to sense where the Spirit may be leading you through this scriptural encounter.

Today’s Prayer for Peace

Engage in a daily practice of praying for peace in our world. Click here to read today’s prayer and be part of this practice of peace.

Click here to comment or read online.

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Daily Bread February 24

Lent-A Spiritual Cleaning
Stassi Cramm, First Presidency


God is calling for a prophetic community to emerge, drawn from the nations of the world, that is characterized by uncommon devotion to the compassion and peace of God revealed in Jesus Christ. Through divine grace and wisdom, this faith community has been given abundant gifts, resources, and opportunities to equip it to become such a people. Chief among these is the power of community in Christ expressed locally in distinctive fashions while upholding a unity of vision, foundational beliefs, and mission throughout the world.  -Doctrine and Covenants 163:11a

I remember entering Lent during 2020 as we had just introduced the guiding question “Are we moving towards Jesus, the peaceful One?” We were still near the beginning of what turned out to be an unimaginable year. Then, part way through Lent, we closed the Temple, sent people home to work remotely, and experienced a new level of isolation with stay-at-home orders.

This unfolding experience gave a whole new meaning to the image of the Israelites wandering in the desert for forty years and Jesus withdrawing into the wilderness for forty days. Now, here we are a year later; and, in many countries, we are still struggling as people scramble to make the COVID-19 vaccine available to everyone. I keep asking myself how am I-how are we-being shaped by the experiences of this very unusual time that is not yet over?

For me, Lent is a time of spiritual cleaning-like spring cleaning-only focused on my life as a disciple instead of my home. As I move through this forty-day journey of intentional reflection, I consider what clutter has entered my life that distracts me from faithful discipleship. The guiding question provides a litmus test for prioritizing what is most important in helping me not only move closer to Jesus, the peaceful One, but also embody His mission. Further, the struggles of the past year serve in shaping my perspective and informing my sense of call.

I confess I have room to grow in my understanding of who Jesus, the peaceful One, really was as shared through the Gospels. It is too easy for me to burden Jesus with who I want him to be instead of allowing his ministry to push me to new levels of faithfulness and discipleship. Even as I anxiously await a time where we can safely be together as families, congregations, and a world church, I am recognizing that being present in the world comes with both new opportunities and challenges to live Christ’s mission in tangible, life-giving ways that share the peace of Christ with ALL people AND creation.

Prayer Phrase

Are we moving toward Jesus, the peaceful One?

Spiritual Practice

Gospel Contemplation (Mark 1:9-11)

Each week during Lent, you are invited to pray with a different gospel story from the life of Christ. Use your senses and imagination to enter the text. Allow it to come to life in you, observing details, noticing interactions, even engaging in dialogue. Notice where you find yourself in the story and how you feel about what is happening. Notice what it evokes in you or invites of you. Take time to journal or enter silent prayer to reflect on your experience and to sense where the Spirit may be leading you through this scriptural encounter.

Today’s Prayer for Peace

Engage in a daily practice of praying for peace in our world. Click here to read today’s prayer and be part of this practice of peace.

Click here to comment or read online.

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Daily Bread February 23

One More Sleepless Night
Dan Gregory of Edina, M N, USA


I cry aloud to God, aloud to God, that he may hear me.
In the day of my trouble I seek the Lord; in the night my hand is stretched out without wearying; my soul refuses to be comforted.
I will call to mind the deeds of the Lord; I will remember your wonders of old.
I will meditate on all your work, and muse on your mighty deeds.
Your way, O God, is holy. What god is so great as our God?  -Psalm 77:1-2, 11-13a

I couldn’t sleep last night.

The injustice of our society pangs my heart.
My prayers were groans of desperation.
While many grieve, too many gloat.
Hatred engulfs more lives, and we lose count.
Our hearts hold vigil thru the night for those who will not be coming home.

I am tired.

The weight of hundreds of years pressed into momentary decisions.
The ostracized being silenced for comfort.
Desperate pleas ignored, rejected, scoffed at.
One more post where words are necessary yet insufficient.

When will we learn?
When can our hearts listen?
When might the cries of our siblings pierce our shallow securities?
When all that fills our ears is the sickening crack of gunfire, how can we hear the trembling left in its wake?

How long, O Lord?!
How long will we turn away?
How long can we stand when the weight of fear presses in upon us?
How long ’til your children awaken?
How long will the call for justice go unanswered?

How long are we to suffer?

At least one more sleepless night, it seems.

Prayer Phrase

Are we moving toward Jesus, the peaceful One?

Spiritual Practice

Gospel Contemplation (Mark 1:9-11)

Each week during Lent, you are invited to pray with a different gospel story from the life of Christ. Use your senses and imagination to enter the text. Allow it to come to life in you, observing details, noticing interactions, even engaging in dialogue. Notice where you find yourself in the story and how you feel about what is happening. Notice what it evokes in you or invites of you. Take time to journal or enter silent prayer to reflect on your experience and to sense where the Spirit may be leading you through this scriptural encounter.

Today’s Prayer for Peace

Engage in a daily practice of praying for peace in our world. Click here to read today’s prayer and be part of this practice of peace.

Click here to comment or read online.

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Daily Bread February 22

One Step Closer to Peace
Tammy Lindle Lewis of Renton, WA, USA


Yet even now, says the Lord,
return to me with all your heart,
with fasting, with weeping, and with mourning;
rend your hearts and not your clothing.
Return to the Lord, your God,
for he is gracious and merciful,
slow to anger, and abounding in steadfast love,
and relents from punishing.  -Joel 2:12-13

I reluctantly admit that I struggle with the practice of moving toward peacefulness of any kind. Upended by the events of 2020, I’ve been fearful, dismayed, angry, and at odds with long-time friends. I’m saddened by those whose social interpretation of the gospel is so different from mine.

I wrestle with a question posed by a member of my congregation: What if our best days are behind us and this is our future reality? What if there isn’t anything better coming and we must live behind masks, separated by disease, physically distanced, weakened by closed businesses and borders, struggling with economic collapse, food insecurity, corruption and power grabs, social unrest, racism, devasting climate change, strained healthcare and educational systems, and lack of effective leadership? The question sounds like facing the ultimate midlife crisis…is this all that’s left? Where is the shining city on the hill? Where are the communities of joy, hope, love, and peace that we talk, sing, and pray about? What is still possible? How will the church give voice to these many issues? What is my role? Will my voice proclaim peace amid the fear, dismay, and anger? And whispering through all of this is the question begging to be wrestled with instead: Am I moving toward Jesus, the peaceful One?

I’m finding the echoes of that question come to the surface more quickly, sometimes before I act or speak. I’m slowing down and remembering to listen, read, and pray. I remind myself that I’m not always right and that I don’t always need to share my opinion. I’m joining online sessions to learn with others as we discuss climate and racial justice and a variety of topics related to peace. I’m remembering to breathe and to forgive my missteps. I’m finding ways to be better and healthier in my soul by eating, sleeping, and spending time and money in more responsible ways.

I am called first to love God and love my neighbor. I’m called to represent Christ in servant leadership, to proclaim and promote justice and peacemaking, to foster spiritual growth and wholeness, and to build bridges between people. When I remember this calling, I realize there is no time to spend in fear, dismay, and anger; and I move one step closer to peace.

Prayer Phrase

Are we moving toward Jesus, the peaceful One?

Spiritual Practice

Gospel Contemplation (Mark 1:9-11)

Each week during Lent, you are invited to pray with a different gospel story from the life of Christ. Use your senses and imagination to enter the text. Allow it to come to life in you, observing details, noticing interactions, even engaging in dialogue. Notice where you find yourself in the story and how you feel about what is happening. Notice what it evokes in you or invites of you. Take time to journal or enter silent prayer to reflect on your experience and to sense where the Spirit may be leading you through this scriptural encounter.

Today’s Prayer for Peace

Engage in a daily practice of praying for peace in our world. Click here to read today’s prayer and be part of this practice of peace.

Click here to comment or read online.

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Daily Bread February 21

The Everlasting Covenant
David Anderson, president of the High Priest Quorum


Make me to know your ways, O Lord;
teach me your paths.
Lead me in your truth, and teach me,
for you are the God of my salvation;
for you I wait all day long.  -Psalm 25:4-5

Today is the first Sunday in Lent. From last Wednesday to the Saturday before Easter, we observe preparation for Easter. Many of us pray, engage more intently in spiritual formation, practice forms of self-denial, and repent of areas of our lives that hinder us from drawing closer to and going deeper with God.

At the heart of this endeavor is an understanding of today’s theme: the everlasting covenant that God has made with humanity and creation. God has a covenantal, sacred relationship with each of us. We-everyone in our world-are created in God’s image, are of inestimable worth, and are beloved children of God.

I recently had surgery that required a general anesthetic. Just before application of the drug that would render me unconscious, I noticed the anesthesiologist patted me gently and reassuringly on the shoulder. In a sterile, cold, and austere operating room, she reached out to me with compassion and hope. I felt deeply touched by her simple act and knew I was under her professional care-and not alone.

Like my anesthesiologist, God reaches out to connect with each of us. We see and feel this Spirit through our spiritual practices, amid our sacred relationships, and within our worship. God’s everlasting covenant means God is with us in our journey. We are not alone. God’s covenant and loving kindness do not guarantee we will avoid suffering, nor do they promise wealth, health, or prosperity. Rather, we are assured of God’s presence, love, and peace. God’s loving mercy, grace, and generosity extend freely to all. As recipients, we become a people of hope. In turn, through acts of kindness, service to others, hospitality, and invitation, we share this hope.

As we continue in Lent, may we listen to the loving, caring, and gentle presence of God and then share it with others. Like my anesthesiologist, may we give “reassuring pats” to all we meet. God loves each of us deeply and wants us to share this sacred everlasting covenant.

Prayer Phrase

Are we moving toward Jesus, the peaceful One?

Spiritual Practice

Gospel Contemplation (Matthew 4:1-11)

Each week during Lent, you are invited to pray with a different gospel story from the life of Christ. Use your senses and imagination to enter the text. Allow it to come to life in you, observing details, noticing interactions, even engaging in dialogue. Notice where you find yourself in the story and how you feel about what is happening. Notice what it evokes in you or invites of you. Take time to journal or enter silent prayer to reflect on your experience and to sense where the Spirit may be leading you through this scriptural encounter.

Today’s Prayer for Peace

Engage in a daily practice of praying for peace in our world. Click here to read today’s prayer and be part of this practice of peace.

Click here to comment or read online.

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Daily Bread February 20

World Day of Social Justice
Kris Judd of Des Moines, IA, USA


Therefore they gave thanks to the Lord their God; and they fasted much and prayed much, and they worshiped God with exceedingly great joy.  -Alma 21:2

Little did we know in January 2020 the challenge and invitation of the church’s guiding question, “Are we moving toward Jesus, the peaceful One?” Last year at this time, my response was, “Of course.” My stable, relatively serene life offered me much time for prayer, reflection, and good deeds; and I tend to be conflict avoidant with family, friends, and strangers. I’m a good person. I try to be peaceful.

And yet, the past year offered me daily invitations to a wrestling match with Jesus, the peaceful One. The tension between a contemplative life and the fight for justice led me to challenging conversations and uncomfortable relationships. I addressed misinformation and disinformation and received responses from people I barely know that offended, angered, and wounded me. I felt very unsure of how to respond with honesty and integrity. Surely Jesus, the peaceful One, would not be so angry, so outraged by what was happening socially, racially, economically, and politically. Jesus proclaimed and lived the way of peace, but can there be peace without justice? And can we address injustice while remaining peaceful?

Wise men and women from our Christian tradition as well as from others have addressed this very real tension through prayer practices that include, among others, centering prayer, meditation, and silence. These practices offer a graceful exit for the righteously indignant ego, allowing it to step away for a bit, and to gain a glimpse of God’s perspective. My experience in such practices leads to a softened and compassionate heart, for both the oppressed and oppressors, for the just and unjust, for those on one side of the argument as well as the other. The injustices still need to be addressed, but responses are no longer from indignation, but from connectedness. It truly is an inward/outward journey.

Sadly, in 2021 the injustices will continue to occur as will the wrestling match with and for Jesus. But we’ve been invited into postures, attitudes, and practices that expand our capacity to live with the tension of being peace-full in peace-less times.
I am grateful that the question remains, “Are we moving closer to Jesus, the peaceful One?” and not, “Have we arrived?”

Prayer Phrase

Are we moving toward Jesus, the peaceful One?

Spiritual Practice

Gospel Contemplation (Matthew 4:1-11)

Each week during Lent, you are invited to pray with a different gospel story from the life of Christ. Use your senses and imagination to enter the text. Allow it to come to life in you, observing details, noticing interactions, even engaging in dialogue. Notice where you find yourself in the story and how you feel about what is happening. Notice what it evokes in you or invites of you. Take time to journal or enter silent prayer to reflect on your experience and to sense where the Spirit may be leading you through this scriptural encounter.

Today’s Prayer for Peace

Engage in a daily practice of praying for peace in our world. Click here to read today’s prayer and be part of this practice of peace.

Click here to comment or read online.

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Daily Bread February 19

Blessings of Promise
Carla Long, Latter Day Seeker Minister


May the God of hope fill you with all joy and peace in believing, so that you may abound in hope by the power of the Holy Spirit.  -Romans 15:13

I am an extrovert by nature. In fact, I had to take some personality tests for a job that I was interviewing for, and the interviewer came back to me and said that my extrovertness was higher than anyone she had ever encountered. If I am by myself for too long, I become just a lump on the couch. I can barely move because I get so much of my energy from other people.

So, needless to say, 2020 was a difficult year for me. We had a newborn baby; and since I was the source of all of his nutrition, I knew that I had to keep myself safe for him. We started sheltering in place on Thursday, March 12, and I remember thinking, “Oh, my goodness! It’s going to be a LOOOOONG weekend if we can’t go anywhere.” And then that weekend stretched and stretched and stretched into the rest of the year, and more.

Since I couldn’t be with the people that I loved-my extended family, my congregation, my friends-I knew that I needed to be more in tune with God and with my body. I needed to listen to both if I was going to make it through this time of social distancing. I made myself a promise that every time someone entered my mind and my heart, I was going to reach out. I was going to, if nothing else, message them and let them know that I was holding space for them.

I cannot tell you how many times that promise blessed me. It would be almost impossible to keep up with everyone in my congregation, even though, as a pastor, I feel that deeply. So, it was freeing to take that off myself and trust that God knows more than I do. My job is to be open and to believe that “opportunities abound in our daily lives if we choose to see them” even when we don’t see anyone but our immediate family.

May God continue to work in and through us in whatever ways we allow God to do.

Prayer Phrase

Are we moving toward Jesus, the peaceful One?

Spiritual Practice

Gospel Contemplation (Matthew 4:1-11)

Each week during Lent, you are invited to pray with a different gospel story from the life of Christ. Use your senses and imagination to enter the text. Allow it to come to life in you, observing details, noticing interactions, even engaging in dialogue. Notice where you find yourself in the story and how you feel about what is happening. Notice what it evokes in you or invites of you. Take time to journal or enter silent prayer to reflect on your experience and to sense where the Spirit may be leading you through this scriptural encounter.

Today’s Prayer for Peace

Engage in a daily practice of praying for peace in our world. Click here to read today’s prayer and be part of this practice of peace.

Click here to comment or read online.

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Daily Bread February 18

Contemplation with Jesus in the Wilderness
Katie Harmon-McLaughlin, World Church Spiritual Formation Team lead


Is not this the fast that I choose: to loose the bonds of injustice,  to undo the thongs of the yoke,
to let the oppressed go free, and to break every yoke?
Is it not to share your bread with the hungry, and bring the homeless poor into your house;
when you see the naked, to cover them, and not to hide yourself from your own kin?
Then your light shall break forth like the dawn, and your healing shall spring up quickly;
your vindicator shall go before you, the glory of the Lord shall be your rearguard.
Then you shall call, and the Lord will answer; you shall cry for help, and he will say, Here I am. -Isaiah 58:6-9

I am sitting in the desert with Jesus. We are famished and tired, sweat baked onto our skin from days of high heat, dry air, no option of bathing. As the temptations unfold before us, I ponder momentarily: Is Jesus foolish or wise for turning down all these things I crave?

Hungering with him, he turns away our chance for bread. My stomach growls, and I grow irritated. He is gentle and steadfast in his explanations. “Wait for what really sustains,” he encourages. I feel my unsettledness turning slowly to ease. An inner strength begins to form each time we say “no” aloud. How many times in my life has the urge of the instant taken the place of a patient nourishing? This resistance is a spiritual act.

A second time, we are tempted with invincibility, the refusal to acknowledge our human vulnerability. We could make ourselves into gods, untouched by the bounds of mortality. As we speak aloud our “no,” I am flooded with the realization that I often want and try to be more than I really am. Jesus places a hand on my knee, affirming, “You are enough. To live into your full capacity is to also know and respect your limits.” The ease within grows deeper. There’s no need to throw myself against the rocks of busyness or achievement to prove that I can withstand the fall.

A third time, we are tempted with all the power, riches, and glory we could ever imagine. I thought I was becoming well practiced in this sacred resistance, but my ego is aroused. “You could be successful!” it says, “Don’t lose this chance to have all this influence!” I begin to justify how the yes might be ok this time, “But, Jesus, we should consider this one! Think of all the good we could do if only we had this power!”

Yet again, gentle and persistent, he offers a sacred no in response. “God’s kingdom,” he says, “cannot be given or taken, only lived. It belongs not to one, but to all. The road to its gate is not success, but humility.”

We sit together in silence, a strength forming. The temptations may continue coming, but we no longer notice. We enter into that richest space that cannot be bought. After a time, we get up and walk toward the city with clarity of heart, reordered priorities and passions. We move together toward the call that beckons, the deepest yes emerging, now free to respond.

Prayer Phrase

Are we moving toward Jesus, the peaceful One?

Spiritual Practice

Gospel Contemplation (Matthew 4:1-11)

Each week during Lent, you are invited to pray with a different gospel story from the life of Christ. Use your senses and imagination to enter the text. Allow it to come to life in you, observing details, noticing interactions, even engaging in dialogue. Notice where you find yourself in the story and how you feel about what is happening. Notice what it evokes in you or invites of you. Take time to journal or enter silent prayer to reflect on your experience and to sense where the Spirit may be leading you through this scriptural encounter.

Today’s Prayer for Peace

Engage in a daily practice of praying for peace in our world. Click here to read today’s prayer and be part of this practice of peace.

Click here to comment or read online.

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Daily Bread February 17

Ash Wednesday
Katie Harmon-McLaughlin, World Church Spiritual Formation Team lead


And whenever you pray, do not be like the hypocrites; for they love to stand and pray in the synagogues and at the street corners, so that they may be seen by others. Truly I tell you, they have received their reward. But whenever you pray, go into your room and shut the door and pray to your Father who is in secret; and your Father who sees in secret will reward you.
And whenever you fast, do not look dismal, like the hypocrites, for they disfigure their faces so as to show others that they are fasting. Truly I tell you, they have received their reward. But when you fast, put oil on your head and wash your face, so that your fasting may be seen not by others but by your Father who is in secret; and your Father who sees in secret will reward you.  -Matthew 6:5, 6, 16-18

Today is Ash Wednesday, the day in the Christian calendar that signals the beginning of the Lenten season. This is an intentional time to journey with Christians from many traditions as we examine our lives, deepen our commitment to discipleship, and make our way with Jesus from the wilderness to the cross. The symbol of ashes has its origins in the Hebrew scriptures as a sign of humility, mortality, and a willingness to admit our utter human creatureliness in the midst of the Eternal God from which we are made and by which we are sustained.

Ashes to ashes. Dust to dust. We are made from this Earth and to this Earth we will return. There is a freedom in remembering this. It highlights what really matters, re-orders our priorities and passions. In cultures unceasing in the message that we need to be more than what we are, this message can be a welcome relief. It may even come with humility of lighthearted laughter, “Oh! I forgot I’m not God! What a relief!”

This year we journey through Lent as the church has been focused on the guiding question, “Are we moving toward Jesus, the peaceful One?” This season feels like an especially significant time to be asking this question together. While it is important to focus on our actions, our responses, our life together, the question directly invites us to place our focus on Jesus-his priorities, his mission, his life and death and what that means for us and our world. Where is Jesus leading us? What does Jesus, the peaceful One, invite? Are we willing to follow where he will lead? Can we join him in the wilderness and release what restricts us so that we can embrace a deeper calling? Slowly, the long journey of Lent is a gift of growing in freedom for faithfulness to follow wherever the peaceful One will lead.

Ashes to ashes. Dust to dust. God, we are yours.

Prayer Phrase

Are we moving toward Jesus, the peaceful One?

Spiritual Practice

Gospel Contemplation (Matthew 4:1-11)

Each week during Lent, you are invited to pray with a different gospel story from the life of Christ. Use your senses and imagination to enter the text. Allow it to come to life in you, observing details, noticing interactions, even engaging in dialogue. Notice where you find yourself in the story and how you feel about what is happening. Notice what it evokes in you or invites of you. Take time to journal or enter silent prayer to reflect on your experience and to sense where the Spirit may be leading you through this scriptural encounter.

Today’s Prayer for Peace

Engage in a daily practice of praying for peace in our world. Click here to read today’s prayer and be part of this practice of peace.

Click here to comment or read online.

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Daily Bread February 16

Our Weakness
Brandon Neloms of Pooler, GA, USA


You are called to create pathways in the world for peace in Christ to be relationally ad culturally incarnate. The Hope of Zion is realized when the vision of Christ is embodied in communities of generosity, justice, and peacefulness. Above all else, strive to be faithful to Christ’s vision of the peaceable Kingdom of God on earth. Courageously challenge cultural, political, and religious trends that are contrary to the reconciling and restoring purposes of God. Pursue peace.  -Doctrine and Covenants 163:3a-b

Earlier this year, I was preparing questions to ask applicants for a new position we needed to fill for my office in Savannah, Georgia. They were all standard questions, plus some that were specific to the job for which they were applying. This day, the question on strengths and weaknesses really stuck out to me. I really couldn’t shake how no one truly gave us a weakness. All applicants would give strengths and try to convince us it was a weakness, even after I tried to assure them it wouldn’t prevent them from getting the job. It was the same kinds of answers over and over that day. I began to get frustrated because, if they weren’t willing to tell the truth, how could I genuinely know the areas they needed to improve? In the end the one or two people who were willing to be honest about their weaknesses allowed for a deeper and more open interview, which in turn resulted in one of them getting the position.

This day made me think of myself and how most of us are moving along in life not willing to recognize the areas we need to improve. Whether it’s in our relationships, on our job, or even within ourselves, we should be willing to admit to ourselves that we have deficiencies that only God can fix.

Some say the first step in fixing a problem is admitting there is a problem. It says in 2 Corinthians 12:9, “…My grace is sufficient for you, for power is made perfect in weakness.” This shows us that admitting weakness is the first step toward God’s power.

I can tell you that, when I finally told God I can’t do it on my own, I realized how much God wanted to help me. My pride blocked God’s blessings. Through admitting my weakness in certain areas of my life, God’s power has made me strong. I assure you, only God can take your greatest weakness and make it your greatest strength. I promise there is no weakness in that fact.

Prayer Phrase

Are we moving toward Jesus, the peaceful One?

Spiritual Practice

Breathing God’s Compassion

Light a candle and sit quietly, reflecting on the fire and light of God. Pay attention to your breathing and let it become calmer and deeper as you focus on God’s presence. Ask God to breathe in you. Image each breath carrying the light of God into your lungs, bloodstream, and every cell in your body until God’s Spirit fills you. Now imagine breathing out God’s compassion and grace each time you exhale. Pray to have the Spirit of Christ radiate from your life like the gentle flame of a candle.

Today’s Prayer for Peace

Engage in a daily practice of praying for peace in our world. Click here to read today’s prayer and be part of this practice of peace.

Click here to comment or read online.

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