Category Archives: Daily Bread Devotional

Daily Bread December 04

A Season to Rejoice
Deb Crowley of Urbandale, IA, USA


For the mountains may depart
    and the hills be removed,
but my steadfast love shall not depart from you,
    and my covenant of peace shall not be removed,
    says the LORD, who has compassion on you. -Isaiah 54:10

Standing in a tree pose to strengthen balance is challenging. Wobbling on one leg, the instinct is to look down at your foot or arms in an effort to remain stable. Instead the teacher instructs us to look into the mirror at a distance to help steady the pose.

The room is lined with mirrors in front and in back of the class. Looking straight ahead does improve balance, but what strikes me most is the view in the mirror. With about 20 senior citizens in the class on any given day the mirror reflects hundreds of us!

It reminds me of the scripture from Doctrine and Covenants 161 which instructs us to “Lift up your eyes and fix them on the place beyond the horizon to which you are sent.” What a view when the focus travels beyond our own being, those surrounding us, or our own spheres where we spend our time and energy. As we look beyond the horizon, we discover a whole world of people just like us, loved by God individually and collectively. The focus beyond “me” is enlightening and energizing and brings life balance.

The scripture continues, “Claim your unique and sacred place within the circle of those who call upon the name of Jesus Christ. Be faithful to the spirit of the Restoration, mindful that it is a spirit of adventure, openness, and searching.”

Our congregation has intentionally begun reaching beyond our comfort zone, beyond the pews! As we engage in the lives of people receiving services and give time and effort to delivering food; preparing bags for delivery; filling first aid boxes; helping at the mobile food pantry; crocheting plastic bag mats; contributing food, toilet paper, and other needed items, it becomes more than giving away “stuff” or time. We are increasing interaction with neighbors around the church and on the food delivery routes for the homeless. For a moment in time souls God loves so deeply become more than faces in a mirror. George, Art, Gail, Mary, and others become real to us and bring blessing to our lives and community.

This is a reason to rejoice! God, let us continue to look beyond the horizon and “walk proudly and with a quickened step. Be a joyful people. Laugh and play and sing, embodying the hope and freedom of the gospel.”

Prayer Phrase

“Trust what is being born” (Stephen M. Veazey, Words of Counsel, 2019).

Spiritual Practice

Deepen your breathing as you enter a few moments of silent presence to God. Pay attention first to your own life as you gently ask and notice, “What is most alive in me right now? What is being born in me?” After a few moments of silent listening, ask these questions of your community, the church, and the world. Notice how the Spirit is revealing new life and possibility as you prayerfully ask these questions over time.

Today’s Prayer for Peace

Engage in a daily practice of praying for peace in our world. Click here to read today’s prayer and be part of this practice of peace.

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Daily Bread December 03

Prayer for Advent
Velma Ruch


Pray for the peace of Jerusalem:
    “May they prosper who love you.
Peace be within your walls,
    and security within your towers.”
For the sake of my relatives and friends
    I will say, “Peace be within you.”
For the sake of the house of the LORD our God,
    I will seek your good. -Psalm 122:6-9

From Finding Home: The Hospitality of God, Graceland University Press, 2006, pp. 14-15

Gracious God,
We come to this Advent season knowing we have been here before with all of the longings, the hopes, the needs that have marked our lives since we were small children. We come having seen some of these longings satisfied, other longings revised for a better vision, some of them lost or discarded, or some crucial ones that still may be unfulfilled. These unfulfilled longings bring us with intensified yearning to this particular season. We know how important it is because the quality of our longings determines the quality of our lives.

Open our eyes, O God, that we may see whatever glimpse of truth you have for us. Help us in these days of preparation for your coming to truly search our hearts under your guidance to become aware of those obstacles that stand in the way of our discipleship. Grant us grace in the inmost parts of our lives. Intensify our hunger for righteousness and your ever-loving presence. If necessary, intensify the pain of our longing, our recognition of a self-inflicted absence of your presence so your healing touch that often brings with it pain before joy may have its way with us. Enlarge our hearts. Illumine our understanding, and allow us to truly feel the joy of your coming.

O God, in this season of Advent, we pray your blessing upon all people, many of whom are suffering, all of whom are struggling to meet the challenges that each day brings. Where hope has been lost, may the star of your coming be illumined for them. Where hearing has been dulled and neutrality replaced vision, may they once again hear the song of the angels: “Glory to God and peace on earth for today is born in Bethlehem a Savior which is Christ the Lord.” May each one recognize that there is a better way than we are now living and that your coming assures us that we can find that way. We commit ourselves once again to the journey that simultaneously leads us home and fulfills our longing for home. In your name we pray. Amen.

Prayer Phrase

“Trust what is being born” (Stephen M. Veazey, Words of Counsel, 2019).

Spiritual Practice

Deepen your breathing as you enter a few moments of silent presence to God. Pay attention first to your own life as you gently ask and notice, “What is most alive in me right now? What is being born in me?” After a few moments of silent listening, ask these questions of your community, the church, and the world. Notice how the Spirit is revealing new life and possibility as you prayerfully ask these questions over time.

Today’s Prayer for Peace

Engage in a daily practice of praying for peace in our world. Click here to read today’s prayer and be part of this practice of peace.

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Daily Bread December 02

Trust What Is Being Born
Katie Harmon-McLaughlin of Independence, MO, USA


Many peoples shall come and say, “Come, let us go up to the mountain of the LORD, to the house of the God of Jacob; that he may teach us his ways and that we may walk in his paths.” For out of Zion shall go forth instruction, and the word of the LORD from Jerusalem. He shall judge between the nations, and shall arbitrate for many peoples; they shall beat their swords into plowshares, and their spears into pruning hooks; nation shall not lift up sword against nation,   neither shall they learn war any more. -Isaiah 2:3-4

In the online Spiritual Formation Series Spirituality Along the Edges, Linda shared a powerful testimony about being formed in the church but longing for a different way of gathering that was more relational, spiritual, and mission-focused. She shared with depth about the strong desire to be the hands and feet of Jesus with other young families in her community. Following this longing, she risked creating a new spiritual community-Beyond the Horizon. It has been a continual journey of discernment, and their intentional but informal gatherings sound like a taste of the kin-dom of God.

As they deepened in Christ-centered relationship together, a way of living mission emerged, and they now spend twice as much time forming community with their neighbors who lack permanent housing than in their own small group experience. The relationships have become so deep, real, and mutually transformative that Linda and her husband chose to spend their anniversary dinner sharing with the men in the transitional living shelter who have become like family. The Spirit is coming alive in a group of young families choosing to risk new ways of gathering together.

Yoga ended as it always does-with an invitation to enter silence and return to the rhythm of our breath. Our yoga instructor, a woman in her early 30s, connected our practice to nonviolence and compassion. She led us through a meditation of self-compassion and compassion for others that brought me to tears of gratitude, joy, and presence. I looked curiously around the room at a growing number of spiritual seekers who are looking for ways to explore their spiritual lives and feel a sense of belonging. Though many would probably not be in church on Sunday morning, I had a strong sense that this, too, was holy encounter. I prayed silently, “God, what do you want me to notice about how you are present here?” The Spirit is coming alive in people who are gathering outside of the church to find meaning and connection.

A perfect autumn night prompted us to start a fire in the backyard. The inviting aroma of the campfire brought our neighbor into our backyard where he stayed for nearly an hour as we shared conversation together. The Spirit is coming alive as we grow in relationship with our neighbors.

This is the pulsing heart of Advent-just when we cannot imagine what will happen next, we remember that incarnation is eternal, continuous, and happening right now. Sometimes I spend so much time worrying about what will happen to the church that I forget to see where Christ’s love and presence are coming to birth all around me. The Spirit is coming alive everywhere I can see! Do you sense it? This Advent, what does it look like in your life and community to trust what is being born?

Prayer Phrase

“Trust what is being born” (Stephen M. Veazey, Words of Counsel, 2019).

Spiritual Practice

Deepen your breathing as you enter a few moments of silent presence to God. Pay attention first to your own life as you gently ask and notice, “What is most alive in me right now? What is being born in me?” After a few moments of silent listening, ask these questions of your community, the church, and the world. Notice how the Spirit is revealing new life and possibility as you prayerfully ask these questions over time.

Today’s Prayer for Peace

Engage in a daily practice of praying for peace in our world. Click here to read today’s prayer and be part of this practice of peace.

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Daily Bread December 01

Work for Peace
William Smith of Independence, MO, USA


Peace I leave with you; my peace I give to you. I do not give to you as the world gives. Do not let your hearts be troubled, and do not let them be afraid. -John 14:27

I’m a poet, and I also love to read. In the mornings, I wake up early. When it’s early there’s just a feeling of peace. But then I have to face the day, and I do. I’m ready for whatever happens.

But peace isn’t just quiet. Peace is euphoria. Peace is rest. Peace is nonviolence. The definition of peace in the dictionary is “harmony in personal relations.” Peace is friendship. In bigger terms peace is also no fighting or war.

There’s a song in one of my favorite musicals called “Wait for It.” But sometimes you can’t just wait for it. If you want peace, you need to work for peace. If you want nonviolence, then you yourself have to work on it. You can try not to fight with your best friend or sibling or colleague just because they say something you disagree with. You can spread smiles around. Or to take it farther still, you could become an activist, going to parades or pride marches.
And me? I do my very best to not get into fights with other boys who tease me. I smile and make new friends. I write my poetry. And I stand up for transgender rights.
If you want peace, you need to work for it. You can’t just wait for it. Whether small or big, do what you can for peace.
Peace is quiet, euphoria, nonviolence, harmony, friendship, and not fighting.

Paz. Paix. Frieden. Peace.

Prayer Phrase

“Trust what is being born” (Stephen M. Veazey, Words of Counsel, 2019).

Spiritual Practice

Deepen your breathing as you enter a few moments of silent presence to God. Pay attention first to your own life as you gently ask and notice, “What is most alive in me right now? What is being born in me?” After a few moments of silent listening, ask these questions of your community, the church, and the world. Notice how the Spirit is revealing new life and possibility as you prayerfully ask these questions over time.

Today’s Prayer for Peace

Engage in a daily practice of praying for peace in our world. Click here to read today’s prayer and be part of this practice of peace.

Click here to comment or read online.

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Daily Bread November 30

On the Road Again
Bruce Lindgren of Independence, MO, USA


They will hunger no more, and thirst no more; the sun will not strike them, nor any scorching heat; for the Lamb at the center of the throne will be their shepherd, and he will guide them to springs of the water of life, and God will wipe away every tear from their eyes. -Revelation 7:16-17

In preparing for an upcoming trip, I’ve been reminded of a quotation from Mark Twain, who was an enthusiastic traveler himself:

Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one\’s lifetime.

I don’t know that Mark Twain was a particularly religious person, but I have found that developing “broad, wholesome, charitable views of [people] and things” is at the heart of the Christian gospel. One of the first challenges faced by the earliest church was the question of whether or not Gentiles should be baptized.

The Apostle Peter, a fisherman and Palestinian Jew, was not a particularly cosmopolitan person. It was on a trip he took to Caesarea, a Roman administrative town built by King Herod the Great, when he had his vision of the unclean animals on a sheet and heard a voice say, “What God has made clean, you must not call profane” (Acts 10:15). Peter’s understanding of who might be included in the blessings of the gospel was greatly expanded.

It may be no accident that Peter was traveling to a town that was much more Greek and Roman than the Galilean fishing villages he had grown up in. Business was conducted in a “foreign” language, and people from all over the world were walking the streets. The trip erased much of Peter’s “prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness,” and the future of the church expanded greatly.

Closing ourselves off into ghettos, where all of the people are a lot like us, leads to a difficult and violent future. New experiences with new people can transform us into more compassionate, more hospitable people. Closing our wagons into a circle can sometimes feel like a wise precaution, but it may not serve the larger call that we receive through the gospel Jesus brought us.

Prayer Phrase

My ordinary life is a sacred place.

Spiritual Practice

Sacramental Living

“…our everyday ordinary lives are also sacred places, or put another way, the sacred place of our living. As dwellers within the Sacredness of Creation, there is potential to be aware and appreciate the holy within the ordinary. You may remember times when it felt like you were seeing the world through God’s eyes. That’s a good description for what it means to live sacramentally-to sense divine Spirit amid daily activities.” -Jane M. Gardner, “Sacramental Living,” September/October 2019 Herald, p. 5

How are you invited to live sacramentally today?

Today’s Prayer for Peace

Engage in a daily practice of praying for peace in our world. Click here to read today’s prayer and be part of this practice of peace.

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Daily Bread November 29

Return
Grace Andrews of Independence, MO, USA


Quickly, bring out a robe-the best one-and put it on him; put a ring on his finger and sandals on his feet. And get the fatted calf and kill it and let us eat and celebrate. -Luke 15:22-23

Rembrandt visualized a “picture” in his head from the scripture in Luke 15 and painted The Return of the Prodigal Son. He saw himself in this painting-an arrogant, proud, insensitive, pleasure-driven young prodigal. Many years later two wives had died as well as five of his six children, leaving him alone without property or possessions. At life’s end, he was still drawn to this story in Luke. So he recreated the famous scene one last time; this time painting himself into it, as he imagined-the loving father.

There are two central characters in this painting-a nearly blind old man wearing a rich red cloak, holding his son with deep compassion. The boy’s tunic is torn, one shoe is off, and he is very dirty. The old man’s hands are on the boy’s shoulders. It is a picture of the most tender embrace from a loving, forgiving father and a repentant son. Many feel the painting should have been called The Loving Father.

The father in this story loves so completely, never asking anything in return. He gives the rebellious younger son and the resentful elder son unconditional, forgiving love. I stand in awe at the place where Rembrandt brings me, a troubled child who kneels at the feet of a bent-over father-a place of blessing. Whether the younger or elder son (or daughter), we are all called to become like the Father. As I walk the Worshiper’s Path in the Temple in Independence, Missouri, I often stop and really look at the beautiful etching of the Prodigal.

Author Henri Nouwen writes: “I kneel before the Father, put my ear against his chest and listen to the heartbeat of God.” I look at my own aging hands and realize they have been given to me to stretch out toward those who suffer. Though I willingly grasp opportunities to offer blessings that emerge from the immensity of God’s love and grace, there is still so much more I can do.

Driving down one of our city streets one day, my eyes were drawn to a man slumped over a fence who appeared discouraged and dejected. A woman sat on the sidewalk with a large bundle-it was likely all she had. I wanted to stop and put my arms around each of them and offer hope, but it was not possible as I moved in heavy traffic. For me, they represented those we see every day. They’re all around us. Who will become a blessing to them if we don’t?

Prayer Phrase

My ordinary life is a sacred place.

Spiritual Practice

Sacramental Living

“…our everyday ordinary lives are also sacred places, or put another way, the sacred place of our living. As dwellers within the Sacredness of Creation, there is potential to be aware and appreciate the holy within the ordinary. You may remember times when it felt like you were seeing the world through God’s eyes. That’s a good description for what it means to live sacramentally-to sense divine Spirit amid daily activities.” -Jane M. Gardner, “Sacramental Living,” September/October 2019 Herald, p. 5

How are you invited to live sacramentally today?

Today’s Prayer for Peace

Engage in a daily practice of praying for peace in our world. Click here to read today’s prayer and be part of this practice of peace.

Click here to comment or read online.

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Daily Bread November 28

Sacramental Living
Katie Harmon-McLaughlin of Independence, MO, USA


To live, we must daily break the body and shed the blood of Creation. When we do this knowingly, lovingly, skillfully, reverently, it is a sacrament. When we do it ignorantly, greedily, clumsily, destructively, it is a desecration. -Wendell Berry, The Art of the Commonplace: Agrarian Essays

Below are three practices for living sacramentally with God, others, and all creation. How are you invited into attention, awe, and gratitude today?

Attention: Begin by noticing your breath. Pay attention to the movement of each inhale and exhale through your body-filling your lungs with oxygen that you need to survive. Let your breath deepen as you gradually wake up to this moment, to this life, to this world.

Look around you. (It may be helpful to go outside!) Simply observe everything within your gaze. Peer deeper into what or whom you might normally rush by on your way to somewhere else. Tend to the details-the veins of a leaf, the texture of the grass, the color of a flower, the lines in your own hands. It may take some discipline to stay focused on one thing long enough to see it deeply. Opportunities for distraction are unceasing. It is worth it to stay present for a little while, to really see the world you are part of, to awaken to the sacredness resident in everything and everyone.

Awe: Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel writes that, “to be spiritual is to be amazed.” Invite curiosity and wonder into your gaze. Ponder the cycles of life that happen without your effort. Consider the story of a leaf or a twig on the ground. Revel at the aliveness of every plant and creature within your sight and remember your intrinsic connection with all that lives as fellow creature in God’s creation. How old is the ground that holds you? How vast is the sky above you? How is every part of this web of life working together in this moment for the flourishing of all?

Gratitude: Give thanks for the gift of breath, for trees that transform carbon dioxide into oxygen. Give thanks for each bite of food and sip of drink that comes from the earth and has sustained your life this day. Give thanks for the clothes you are wearing that were woven together from materials that come from the land. Give thanks for the smallest creatures that you can see, and those you cannot, that contribute to the biodiversity necessary for each eco-system to thrive. Give thanks for the relationships that support and sustain you. Notice that your very aliveness is dependent on this planet. Let gratitude grow in you a deeper awareness of how you want to live this day-each action in harmony with the world you are part of, each choice a movement toward justice and wholeness for all creation.

Prayer Phrase

My ordinary life is a sacred place.

Spiritual Practice

Sacramental Living

“…our everyday ordinary lives are also sacred places, or put another way, the sacred place of our living. As dwellers within the Sacredness of Creation, there is potential to be aware and appreciate the holy within the ordinary. You may remember times when it felt like you were seeing the world through God’s eyes. That’s a good description for what it means to live sacramentally-to sense divine Spirit amid daily activities.” -Jane M. Gardner, “Sacramental Living,” September/October 2019 Herald, p. 5

How are you invited to live sacramentally today?

Today’s Prayer for Peace

Engage in a daily practice of praying for peace in our world. Click here to read today’s prayer and be part of this practice of peace.

Click here to comment or read online.

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Daily Bread November 27

Jesus, the Peaceful One
Stephen M. Veazey, president of Community of Christ


If it is possible, so far as it depends on you, live peaceably with all. -Romans 12:18

The love, message, and embrace of Jesus Christ are broad beyond measure. By their very nature they must be shared widely, or they are not being shared at all. They are not limited to just me, “my kind of people,” or some preferred nation, culture, or race. If we truly are moving toward and with Jesus, then the church community constantly will venture beyond all kinds of perceived boundaries and horizons to invite others to drink deeply of Christ’s life-giving water in loving community.

If we as Community of Christ truly are “on our way to him,” then Jesus’ passions and concerns will visibly be our passions and concerns (Doctrine and Covenants 164:9d). Any gaps between our views and his vision will be resolved as we move toward him! Not by trying to conform him to us. That’s what it means to be “on our way to him”! It is ongoing personal and communal spiritual transformation in Christ as a life-long adventure!

When 2 Corinthians 5:17 NRSV states “…if anyone is in Christ, there is a new creation: everything old has passed away…,” it is talking about much more than personal salvation. It is proclaiming that if we truly are living and moving “in Christ,” we are becoming a new kind of human being within a new kind of humanity. Ephesians 2:15 (NRSV) further illuminates this truth by describing the ultimate work of Christ to “create in himself one new humanity…, thus making peace.”

Some authors conclude Jesus was the prototype or forerunner of a new “peaceful humanity.” They emphasize Jesus’ peaceful manner. Even when he experienced persecution and violence by crucifixion, he stayed true to his peaceful nature without returning violence for violence. His steadfastness on the cross as he suffered horrible violence reveals the truth that our common redemption and calling in Christ is to be “peaceful humanity.”

What if baptisms, confirmations, and observances of the Lord’s Supper in Community of Christ emphasized that calling in addition to conventional meanings? How might we think, speak, and interact differently as disciples of the peaceful One?

Scripture testifies that all creation waits “with eager longing” (Romans 8:19 NRSV) for peaceful humanity to appear on the world stage to turn the tide of hate, agony, and destruction. With that in mind, the central question raised by our text looms even larger. Are we moving toward Jesus, the peaceful One? Or are we retreating from Jesus by reverting to our old humanity and its destructive ways of interacting with others and creation?

(Excerpt from “Discover Your Future,” World Conference 2019 Sermon)

Prayer Phrase

My ordinary life is a sacred place.

Spiritual Practice

Sacramental Living

“…our everyday ordinary lives are also sacred places, or put another way, the sacred place of our living. As dwellers within the Sacredness of Creation, there is potential to be aware and appreciate the holy within the ordinary. You may remember times when it felt like you were seeing the world through God’s eyes. That’s a good description for what it means to live sacramentally-to sense divine Spirit amid daily activities.” -Jane M. Gardner, “Sacramental Living,” September/October 2019 Herald, p. 5

How are you invited to live sacramentally today?

Today’s Prayer for Peace

Engage in a daily practice of praying for peace in our world. Click here to read today’s prayer and be part of this practice of peace.

Click here to comment or read online.

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Daily Bread November 26

Grace and Generosity
Lorne and Dianne Soehner of Fonthill, Ontario, Canada


By the tender mercy of our God, the dawn from on high will break upon us, to give light to those who sit in darkness and in the shadow of death, to guide our feet into the way of peace. -Luke 1:78-79

We went to one of our favorite local restaurants for our anniversary dinner. We were talking to our server about our anniversary. She was really sweet and said she couldn’t believe we had been married for 48 years. She said that we look young. (We told you she was sweet!)

A couple sitting across from us that we did not know left the restaurant before us, and on their way out they stopped at our table. They had heard us mention our anniversary and wished us a very happy anniversary. We thanked them and they left.

Later our server, who had also been serving them, came over to us and said the couple had paid for our dinner. We were caught completely off guard that complete strangers would think to do such a lovely gesture. We told our server that if she sees them in the restaurant again to tell them how thoughtful and sweet it was for them to do that.

There really are very wonderful people out there and we experienced that firsthand.

Prayer Phrase

My ordinary life is a sacred place.

Spiritual Practice

Sacramental Living

“…our everyday ordinary lives are also sacred places, or put another way, the sacred place of our living. As dwellers within the Sacredness of Creation, there is potential to be aware and appreciate the holy within the ordinary. You may remember times when it felt like you were seeing the world through God’s eyes. That’s a good description for what it means to live sacramentally-to sense divine Spirit amid daily activities.” -Jane M. Gardner, “Sacramental Living,” September/October 2019 Herald, p. 5

How are you invited to live sacramentally today?

Today’s Prayer for Peace

Engage in a daily practice of praying for peace in our world. Click here to read today’s prayer and be part of this practice of peace.

Click here to comment or read online.

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Daily Bread November 25

Changed
Kenton Cowick of Cary, NC, USA


Let mutual love continue. Do not neglect to show hospitality to strangers, for by doing that some have entertained angels without knowing it. Remember those who are in prison, as though you were in prison with them; those who are being tortured, as though you yourselves were being tortured. Keep your lives free from the love of money, and be content with what you have; for he has said, “I will never leave you or forsake you.” So we can say with confidence, “The Lord is my helper; I will not be afraid.” -Hebrews 13:1-3, 5-6a

At the age of 12 I was one of five attending the pre-baptism class of the small Wakenda Congregation. At the end of the classes everyone except me agreed to be baptized. The pastor, wanting 100%, invited himself to our home for Sunday dinner. Our small home had no space for privacy so the pastor asked me to join him in his car. He talked and talked. Wanting to hear the St. Louis Cardinals baseball game I told him “YES.”

When I was 14, I told my mom I could not go to church Sunday morning because I needed to help prepare the baseball field for our game that afternoon. That was the end of my church attendance for five years.

After graduating from high school, I was given the chance to attend Rolla School of Engineering and Metallurgy for eight weeks. I started working on a survey party for the highway department. I began to observe the actions of my coworkers. One person in particular was very selfish and self-serving. He felt the world circled around him. The Sunday school teachers who had dedicated their lives to others came to mind. What was I going to do with my life?

I knew what I had to do. I made a date with God for 30 days later. During that 30 days I prepared by study and prayer. I even read from the Book of Mormon which I had never done.

The thirtieth day was a Saturday. Since I went home on the weekends, I was at my parents’ small farm. I went to a secluded area and knelt to pray. My eyes were closed but I felt a tremendous darkness come over me, creating fear I had never felt before. I continued to pray. The darkness was replaced by amazing light with two brighter lights, one more brilliant then the other. These words were impressed on my mind: I love you. Your sins are forgiven. Follow the teachings of my Son.

My life was completely changed!

Prayer Phrase

My ordinary life is a sacred place.

Spiritual Practice

Sacramental Living

“…our everyday ordinary lives are also sacred places, or put another way, the sacred place of our living. As dwellers within the Sacredness of Creation, there is potential to be aware and appreciate the holy within the ordinary. You may remember times when it felt like you were seeing the world through God’s eyes. That’s a good description for what it means to live sacramentally-to sense divine Spirit amid daily activities.” -Jane M. Gardner, “Sacramental Living,” September/October 2019 Herald, p. 5

How are you invited to live sacramentally today?

Today’s Prayer for Peace

Engage in a daily practice of praying for peace in our world. Click here to read today’s prayer and be part of this practice of peace.

Click here to comment or read online.

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